Topic Contraception controversial provision

Topic:Contraception: controversial provision

Contraception:controversial provision

Afterthe Affordable Health Care Act was approved, contraceptive carecontinued to be the most controversial provision and drew commentsfrom more than the rest of the regulatory proposals ongovernment-wide subjects. Numerous people and organizations havevoiced their opinions over the debate with majority being against theprovision that obligates that women obtain preventive services freeof charge as interpreted by federal agencies. Churches, includingcatholic, have been leading the charge while trying to convince theircongregation that pregnancy is not a disease and that surgeries anddrugs meant for prevention of pregnancy are not basic health care,which the government is supposed to obligate all Americans to buy(Monsma, 2014).

Thesuccess of the church in convincing its congregations to oppose andto act against the provision demonstrates the amount of power thatrests on its faithful (DeAngelis, 2014). On the other hand, womengroups along with other liberal organizations have also beenaddressing the issue with some activists suggesting that aspects likebirth control are fundamental for all women and the government is notsupposed to allow one religious viewpoint to overrule a good healthpolicy for the public.

Thegovernment has been seeking to reach a compromise that the catholicand other religious communities would be comfortable with even thoughthis has been a challenging endeavor (Castle, 2013). Church leadershave been against the attempts by the government to exempt variousreligious organizations along with some hospitals affiliated withdifferent religions from directly paying to be covered in regards tocontraceptives. They argue that health insurance is supposed to beresponsible for paying for the coverage (Kelly, Magill, &amp Have,2013). However, federal courts have been differing over the legalityof the provision concerning contraception and it is expected that theSupreme Court will address the issue.

References

Castle,M. (2013).&nbspCultureWars.Chicago: See Sharp Press.

DeAngelis,C. (2014).&nbspPatientcare and profesionalism.New York: Oxford University Press.

Kelly,D., Magill, G., &amp Have, H. (2013).&nbspContemporaryCatholic health care ethics.Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Monsma,S. (2014).&nbspPluralismand freedom.Lanham, Md: Rowman &amp Littlefield Publishers, Inc.