Oral health Related Quality of Life Measures (OHRQol)

Oralhealth Related Quality of Life Measures (OHRQol)

Description

Oralhealth-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is a relatively new conceptthat has been mostly used in the understanding of dental and facialdiseases as well as how such diseases affect the community as awhole. Different approaches have been used to measure OHRQoL, but sofar the most effective approach is the use of multiple itemquestionnaires. Any oral health program in the community is requiredto have a base in OHRQoL[ CITATION Dar13 l 1033 ].The above description of OHRQoLcan be analyzed by viewing thedefinition of health,which refers to a person`s state of being well physically, mentally,and socially. Being healthy does not only mean that a person is freeof illness, but his or her general well-being is in excellentcondition[ CITATION Fio14 l 1033 ].

Mainmeasurements in a table

Questionnaire

Content validity

Internal consistency

Construct validity

Reliability

CPQ11–14

+

?

+++

+

CPQ8–10

?

+

++

+

CPQ11–14short forms

n/a

?

+

+

COHIP

+++

?

+++

+

C-OIDP

+

?

+

+

Limitationof questionnaires to assess OHRQoL

Thefirst limitation of using questionnaires is that clarifying theconcepts of the disease in question, oral health of the patient andlife can be a daunting task and when rushed cannot yield the desiredresults. The aspects of health and life of people are elusivehence,it can be hard to measure them[ CITATION Ale04 l 1033 ].Further,defining such concepts can be a hard task thus, resulting to somelimitations to the questionnaire. Moreover, the idea of health ismostly confused because it involves many contradicting terms, whichcannot be understood easily.

Oralimpact on daily performance (OIDP)

TheOIDP area of dental research is an ignored part, and its assessmentshows that it is a reliable and valid version of measurement. Theadvantage of the oral impact of the daily performance is that itbrings more results that are valid and can be relied on as comparedto other overall clinical measures. The oral health of patients maynot be accessed effectively with the use of the normal clinicalmeasures hence the need for the use of the OIDP[ CITATION Mar092 l 1033 ].

Limitationsof OIDP measure

Themain limitation of the OIDP is that it only takes a sample of theoverall population hence, there is a likelihood of giving falseresults. As an instrument of OHRQoL, the impact of the dailyperformance is not very valid thus, it cannot be relied upon to givethe actual results of an entire population[ CITATION Ann03 l 1033 ].Dental experts also point out that the measurement and assessing ofdental needs requires a much broader understanding of theperspectives of being &quothealthy&quot and &quotneedy&quot forthe patient. The use of OIDP measure also fails to consider that theentire population cannot be handled because of the insufficientsources that are available. Such a scenario means thatonly a portion of the population will be able to be treated. Anotherlimitation is that the OIDP measure is only useful to the upper andmiddle classes people thus, hence the lower members of the societycannot access it[ CITATION Gar96 l 1033 ].

Effectslimitation of OIDP

Themost common effect of OIDP is that it is validated and adapted to therelevance of the local population hence, it can be used effectively.OIDP surveys show that people studied have difficulties with eatingand enjoying food and doing other body cleaning activities, such asteeth brushing. Shaping the adaptation and response of adults to theoral disorders requires both social and behavioral contexts. Forinstance, the young population needs some measures of oral quality oflife incorporated into services of oral health.

Ceilingeffects limitation of OIDP

Theterm ceiling effects limitation refers to the level at which avariable that is independent is no longer able to have an impact on avariable that is dependent. It may also be used to describe a certainlevel where variance, in an independent adjustable, cannot bedignified or even projected. In relation to OIDP, the first meaningstates that OIDP can reach a stage whereby it has no further effecton the study, or has reached its optimal levels. The second meaningstates that the study of OIDP can be conducted on certain members ofthe society while leaving others out or it can be conducted on thewhole population without distinguishing how each population earns.

References

Åstrøm, A. N. (2003). Validity and reliability of the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) frequency scale: a cross-sectional study of adolescents in Uganda. Biomed Central, 33-78.

Bennadi, D. (2013). Oral health related quality of life. Journal of international society of preventure and community dentistry , 1-6.

Gilchrist, F. (2014). Assessment of the quality of measures of child oral health-related quality of life. Biomed central , 14-40.

Hobdell, M. (2009). Using an oral health-related quality of life measure in three cultural settings . International dental journal, 381-388.

Jokovic, A. (2004). Questionnaire for Measuring Oral Health-related quality of life in eight-to ten-year-old children. Scientific article , 512-517.

Slade, G. D. (1996). Measuring Oral Health and quality of life . conference , 1-1172.