Earth From Above

3

Oil Fields near Bakersfield, California, USA.

The coordinates of the landscape are 35023’11.85” N119037’24.58” W elev 1888 ft.1Thephoto shows a vast piece of land with numerous oil fields. The areahas no vegetation all that is visible are well pumps that stem outof the ground. The ground is seemingly flat owing to the wide scopeof land captured by the photographer. Areas that are not dup up inthe search for oil have white sand. Towards the background of thephotograph, there is vegetation a clear indication that lack ofvegetation at the foreground of the photo is due to mining activitiesand not the climate of the area. Storage tanks dot the photo, but thewells pumps at the oil wells seem to outnumber them. A railway lineis also present. Maybe it is necessary for transporting crude oil tothe refinery.

As the name suggests, human beings use this land for the purposes ofmining oil. The oil reserves that lay beneath the landscape have madeit eligible for exploitation by human beings. The landscape is amongthe richest oilfields in the USA. The federal government leases theland to private drillers who extract oil for commercial use2.The companies that drill oil can wish to extend their lease or optout upon the completion of the agreed period. However, it is only 7%of the wells in the landscape that belong to the government the restbelong top private individuals and corporations. Among thecorporation that drill oil in this landscape include shell oil, awell-known multinational company which has its presence in all thecontinents of the world. From a global perspective, this type of landuse experienced on the landscape is responsible for pollution andland degradation.

Human beings use this land for drilling oil because it has oilreserves. If it were not for the oil reserves, the land would havebeen used for something else, say farming or urban development. Theeconomic importance associated with oil also plays a major role inthe way human beings use this land. The process of drilling oil isexpensive but many corporation go to deeper lengths to get theprecious commodity because it is a viable economic venture. Some ofthe oil well in this landscape can go as deep as 30 miles3.To the locals, the oil field is a source of livelihood. Without it,the area could as well be dead. The oil fields employ a largeproportion of the people living around the landscape. To them, oil isa precious commodity and not something, which pollutes theenvironment.

I used the information on the caption of the photograph to get themood of the photographer. As it turns out, the host website of thephoto feels, that overreliance on non-renewable energy is the causeof climatic problems on earth. According to the international cleanenergy agency87% of the energy used in the world today isnon-renewable4.I used this information to get a worldwide perspective of my chosenlandscape. I compared the foreign perspective with what the localthink about the landscape and found a great disparity. While onethinks of it as a source of livelihood, the other party is of theidea that the landscape is the reason for climatic problems that theearth is experiencing.

Bibliography List

ArthusYann. Oil Fields near Bakersfield, California, USA. Googleearth, 2013.

Bureau of Land Management. Oil and Gas Operations- Bakersfield FieldOffice. 2016. Retrieved from,http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/bakersfield/Programs/Minerals/bkfo_minerals.htmlAccessed June 17, 2016

Blanchard, Olivier J., and Jordi Gali. The Macroeconomic Effects ofOil Shocks: Why are the 2000s so different from the 1970s?. No.w13368. National Bureau of Economic Research, 2007

International energy agency. Accessing the transition to cleanenergies technology. 2016. Retrieved from http://www.iea.org/accessed June 17, 2016.

1ArthusYann. Oil Fields near Bakersfield, California, USA. Google earth, 2013.

2Bureau of Land Management. Oil and Gas Operations- Bakersfield Field Office. 2016. Retrieved from &lt http://www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/bakersfield/Programs/Minerals/bkfo_minerals.html&gt accessed June 17, 2016.

3Blanchard, Olivier J., and Jordi Gali. The Macroeconomic Effects of Oil Shocks: Why are the 2000s so different from the 1970s?. No. w13368. National Bureau of Economic Research, 2007.

4International energy agency. Accessing the transition to clean energies technology. 2016. Retrieved from http://www.iea.org/ accessed June 17, 2016.