ATTACHMENT THEORY

ATTACHMENTTHEORY

AnnotatedBibliography on Attachment

AnnotatedBibliography on Attachment

Landa,S., &amp Duschinsky, R. (2013). Crittenden’s dynamic–maturationalmodel of attachment and adaptation. Reviewof General Psychology,17(3),326.

Landaand Duschinsky engage a systematic and a comprehensive explanation ofthe dynamic–maturationalmodelby Patricia Crittenden, which aims to offer a theory of attachment,as well as adaptation. The authors review the work of Crittenden asestablished by her expert collaboration with another remarkableauthor, Mary Ainsworth. The authors are keen to indicate that thecollaboration was a key factor in the establishment of Crittenden’sinsight of the subject matter, and on the platforms of cognitivescience and developmental psychology.

Wilcox,D. T., &amp Baim, C. (2015). Applications of theDynamic‐MaturationalModel of Attachment with Children Involved in Care and FamilyProceedings. ChildAbuse Review.

Theliterature by Wilcox and Baim reviews the attachment patterns ofinfants in scenarios where there is a grave need for safeguardingthem. Specific matters of interest in the article involve, but arenot limited to physical and psychological abuse of children by theadults who ought to be figures of attachment to the children. Thepiece also explains elements of attachment theory, and its relevanceto the understanding of human relationships. Moreover, the articlealso focuses on the application of the Dynamic Maturational Model ofattachment.

Umemura,T., Jacobvitz, D., Messina, S., &amp Hazen, N. (2013). Do toddlersprefer the primary caregiver or the parent with whom they feel moresecure? The role of toddler emotion. InfantBehavior and Development,36(1),102-114.

Thisarticle offers information about a study that investigates JohnBowlby`s theory of attachment, as well as the hypothesis by Ainsworthon the same subject matter. Both scholars were of the opinion thathierarchies of caregivers develop in the minds of children, makingthem prefer some caregivers to others. The study by Umemura et al.investigates this hypothesis in a meticulous manner

Svanberg,P. O., Mennet, L., &amp Spieker, S. (2010). Promoting a secureattachment: A primary prevention practice model. ClinicalChild Psychology and Psychiatry,15(3),363-378.

Thisarticle evaluates evidence-based information regarding therelationship between the sensitive care for children, and theachievement of secure attachments during times of infancy. Theauthors offer a report based on the clinical programs that aim toevaluate parent—infant interactions.

References

Landa,S., &amp Duschinsky, R. (2013). Crittenden’s dynamic–maturationalmodel of attachment and adaptation. Reviewof General Psychology,17(3),326.

Svanberg,P. O., Mennet, L., &amp Spieker, S. (2010). Promoting a secureattachment: The primary prevention practice model. ClinicalChild Psychology and Psychiatry,15(3),363-378.

Umemura,T., Jacobvitz, D., Messina, S., &amp Hazen, N. (2013). Do toddlersprefer the primary caregiver or the parent with whom they feel moresecure? The role of toddler emotion. InfantBehavior and Development,36(1),102-114.

Wilcox,D. T., &amp Baim, C. (2015). Applications of theDynamic‐MaturationalModel of Attachment with Children Involved in Care and FamilyProceedings. ChildAbuse Review.